NYC Pharmacy Charges 7% “Man Tax” To Make A Statement About Gender Discrimination

Because women, on average, pay 7% more for personal products than men, this Manhattan pharmacy implemented a "man tax" to spur conversation about inequality in the U.S.


In the past century, women in the U.S. have been afforded more rights than females have been granted for thousands of years. However, inequality among the sexes continues to exist in America. According to a study conducted by the NYC consumer affairs department, women’s products cost, on average, 7% more than men’s. To make a statement about this form of gender discrimination, a chemist in Manhattan decided to implement a 7% “man tax” in a pharmacy.

Jolie Alony, the owner of Thompson Chemists in SoHo, told The Daily Dot: 

“We thought it’d be a great idea with all the political things going on—with Clinton being such a woman and the other guy and his womanizing. We wanted to share that women deserve to get a break, and men deserve to be charged 7 percent more. Women are spending more in general and we make less, so we deserve to have a break.”

Sometimes the best way to draw awareness to an issue is through outrageous acts – which is what many critics are deeming this “man tax” to be. Still, others are in support of the tax, as it sparks conversation about why gender equality hasn’t yet been reached in the U.S.

Because it’s technically illegal to charge male customers more for the same product, Alony has been paying the difference out of pocket. Still, her bold activism is worthy of attention.


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