Guy Collects 35 Bags Of Microplastics On Beach In ONE Day To Create Conscious Art

This activist creates art out of the pollution he scavenges to raise awareness about our planet's plastic problem.

Credit: Rob Arnold

While out for a stroll in April, Rob Arnold of the Rame Peninsula Beach Care team noticed an incredible amount of microplastic on the Tregantle beach, UK. Disheartened to see pollution where gorgeous scenery should instead exist, he began collecting the rubbish with a few other volunteers.

“I am fairly used to it as I have been doing it for four years, but the way it was this time was a shock to me, it was desperate,” Rob told Cornwall Live. “I really felt it had gone too far and it may be too late to clean it up, but I thought we may as well try. It was like the ocean had vomited it out and presented it to us and I felt it was our duty to clean it up.”

In that one day, Arnold scavenged about 35 bags of trash, among which he found a collection of LEGO diving tanks and flippers, dozens of plastic toy soldiers and numerous other random artifacts. While the activist could have recycled the trash and felt good about himself, he decided to go one step further and make art out of the micro-plastic he collected.

The artwork he’s completed using the trash can now be found in Liskeard Museum as part of The Plastic Age exhibition. Other works of art include contributions from Tracey Williams of Lego Lost at Sea, Michelle Costello of Smartie Lids on the Beach and Louise Slee of Tregantle Beach Treasures, Trinkets and Trash.

Rob Arnold went for a walk on Tregantle beach and was stunned to see this:

Credit: Rob Arnold

The entire shoreline was covered with microplastics

Credit: Rob Arnold

So, he and a few other volunteers started collecting the rubbish

Credit: Rob Arnold

In one day, they managed to scavenge 35 bags of trash!

Credit: Rob Arnold

“I am fairly used to it as I have been doing it for four years, but the way it was this time was a shock to me, it was desperate”

Credit: Rob Arnold

Arnold found all kinds of random objects

Credit: Rob Arnold

Credit: Rob Arnold

Like a collection of toy soldiers

Credit: Rob Arnold

and LEGO diving flippers

Credit: Rob Arnold

Because the activist is also an artist, he decided to turn the pollution into artwork

Credit: Rob Arnold

Credit: Rob Arnold

All his pieces are now being exposed in The Plastic Age exposition at Liskeard Museum

Credit: Rob Arnold

Credit: Rob Arnold

Credit: Rob Arnold

Credit: Rob Arnold

Credit: Rob Arnold

Credit: Rob Arnold

Credit: Rob Arnold

Credit: Rob Arnold

Credit: Rob Arnold

Credit: Rob Arnold

Credit: Rob Arnold

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