Carpenter Builds Timber Cabin With Stunning Views On Minimal Budget

The cabin is cost-effective and boasts an open plan design.

Credit: Inhabitat

A montreal based architecture firm has helped a young carpenter to build his first house with a modest budget and timber materials. After coming up with the idea of building his first home himself, he turned to Atelier l’Abri for help with the design. The architecture company came up with a modern and uncomplicated design for a cabin that fitted the brief for the home that now recedes into forested surroundings of Bolton, in Quebec’s Eastern Townships. The first of l’Abri’s house design is a self-build project named Wood Duck, which is a reference to the timber that has been used for the structure of the home, as well as the cladding and interior finishes.

Credit: Inhabitat

The architects’ aim for the building of the house was to keep the design of the Wood Duck as simple as possible in order to stick with the client’s tight budget. To fully take advantage and add value to the compact design, the home faces south to overlook the valley which boasts views of the ski slopes of Mount Glen as well as the river below. The cabin also includes three large windows on the south facade, which are situated to take full advantage of the vistas, whilst their size helps to blur the boundary of being inside and being out in nature. The inside uses hemlock spruce, which is a cost-effective and rugged material, and also helps to blend the cabin into its surroundings.

Credit: Inhabitat

The two storey cabin is square in shape, with the ground floor being filled with an open-plan and double-height living room, dining area, and kitchen in the south, while the service-oriented rooms, such as the laundry and mudroom, are tucked away in the north. The purposely designed open-plan living areas are filled with natural light and overlook the surrounding landscape and an outdoor deck. The master bedroom, secondary bedroom, office, and shared bathroom are all located on the upper floor.

Credit: Inhabitat

Credit: Inhabitat

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