10 Compelling Reasons You Can Never Trust The Mainstream Media

By: Sophie McAdam,

True Activist.

A poll last year showed that trust in the mainstream media is increasing, which should worry all of us who value truth, integrity and press freedom. Why? Here are 10 disturbing things everyone needs to know about the global media giants who control our supply of information, wielding immense power over the people- and even over the government.

1. Mainstream media exists solely to make profit

Image Credit:  ♥ photofairy

Murdoch: Evil wizard
Image Credit: ♥ photofairy

What´s the purpose of the mainstream media? Saying that the press exists to inform, educate or entertain is like saying Apple corporation´s primary function is to make technology which will enrich our lives. Actually, the mass media industry is the same as any other in a capitalist society: it exists to make profit. Medialens, a British campaigning site which critiques mainstream (or corporate) journalism, quoted business journalist Marjorie Kelly as saying that all corporations, including those dealing with media, exist only to maximize returns to their shareholders. This is, she said,  ´the law of the land…universally accepted as a kind of divine, unchallengeable truth´. Without pleasing shareholders and a board of directors, mass media enterprises simply would not exist. And once you understand this, you´ll never watch the news in the same way again.

Flicr / WilliamBanzai7/Colonel Flick

´journalist´ Andrew Ross Sorkin and the Goldman Sachs connection
Flickr / WilliamBanzai7/Colonel Flick

2. Advertisers dictate content

So how does the pursuit of profit affect the news we consume? Media corporations make the vast majority (typically around 75%) of their profit from advertising, meaning it´s advertisers themselves that dictate content- not journalists, and certainly not consumers. Imagine you are editor of a successful newspaper or TV channel with high circulation or viewing figures. You attract revenue from big brands and multinational corporations such as BP, Monsanto and UAE airlines. How could you then tackle important topics such as climate change, GM food or disastrous oil spills in a way that is both honest to your audience and favorable to your clients? The simple answer is you can´t. This might explain why Andrew Ross Sorkin of the New York Times-  sponsored by Goldman Sachs-  is so keen to defend the crooked corporation. Andrew Marr, a political correspondent for the BBC, sums up the dilemma in his autobiography: ´The biggest question is whether advertising limits and reshapes the news agenda. It does, of course. It’s hard to make the sums add up when you are kicking the people who write the cheques.´ Enough said…

3. Billionaire tycoons & media monopolies threaten real journalism

Image Credit - Flickr / Mike Licht

Image Credit – Flickr / Mike Licht

The monopolization of the press (fewer individuals or organizations controlling increasing shares of the mass media) is growing year by year, and this is a grave danger to press ethics and diversity. Media mogul Rupert Murdoch´s  neo-liberal personal politics are reflected in his 175 newspapers and endorsed by pundits (see Fox news) on the 123 TV channels he owns in the USA alone. Anyone who isn´t worried by this one man´s view of the world being consumed by millions of people across the globe- from the USA to the UK, New Zealand to Asia, Europe to Australia- isn´t thinking hard enough about the consequences. It´s a grotesquely all-encompassing monopoly, leaving no doubt that Murdoch is one of the most powerful men in the world. But as the News International phone hacking scandal  showed, he´s certainly not the most honorable or ethical. Neither is Alexander Lebedev, a former KGB spy and politician who bought British newspaper The Independent  in 2010.  With Lebedev´s fingers in so many pies (the billionaire oligarch is into everything from investment banking to airlines), can we really expect news coverage from this once well-respected publication to continue in the same vein? Obviously not: the paper had always carried a banner on its front page declaring itself  ´free from party political bias, free from proprietorial influence´, but interestingly this was dropped in September 2011.

4. Corporate press is in bed with the government

Photo: Dafydd Jones (telegraph.co.uk)

British Prime Minister David Cameron partying with Rebekah Brooks
Photo: Dafydd Jones (telegraph.co.uk)

Aside from the obvious, one of the most disturbing facts to emerge from Murdoch´s News International phone hacking scandal (background information here ) was the exposure of shady connections  between top government officials and press tycoons. During the scandal, and throughout the subsequent Leveson inquiry into British press ethics (or lack of them), we learned of secret meetings, threats by Murdoch to politicians who didn´t do as he wanted, and that Prime Minister David Cameron has a very close friendship with The Sun´s then editor-in-chief (and CEO of News International) Rebekah Brooks. How can journalists do their job of holding politicians to account when they are vacationing together or rubbing shoulders at private dinner parties? Clearly, they don´t intend to. But the support works both ways- Cameron´s government tried to help Murdoch´s son win a bid for BSkyB, while bizarrely,  warmongering ex Prime Minister Tony Blair is godfather to Murdoch´s daughter Grace. As well as ensuring an overwhelming bias in news coverage and election campaigns, flooding newspapers with cheap and easy articles from unquestioned government sources, and gagging writers from criticizing those in power, these secret connections also account for much of the corporate media´s incessant peddling of the patriotism lie-  especially in the lead-up to attacks on other countries. Here´s an interesting analysis of The New York Times´s coverage of the current Syria situation for example, demonstrating how corporate journalists are failing to reflect public feeling on the issue of a full-scale attack on Assad by the US and its allies.

Image Credit: heavy.com

Image Credit: heavy.com

5. Important stories are overshadowed by trivia

You could be forgiven for assuming that the most interesting part of Edward Snowden´s status as a whistleblower was his plane ride from Hong Kong to Russia, or his lengthy stint waiting in Moscow airport for someone- anyone- to offer him asylum. Because with the exception of The Guardian who published the leaks (read them in full here), the media has generally preferred not to focus on Snowden´s damning revelations about freedom and tyranny, but rather on banal trivia – his personality and background, whether his girlfriend misses him, whether he is actually a Chinese spy, and ahhh, didn´t he remind us all of Where´s Waldo as he flitted across the globe as a wanted fugitive? The same could be said of Bradley Manning´s gender re-assignment, which conveniently overshadowed the enormous injustice of his sentence. And what of Julian Assange? His profile on the globally-respected BBC is dedicated almost entirely to a subtle smearing of character, rather than detailing Wikileaks´s profound impact on our view of the world. In every case, the principal stories are forgotten as our attention, lost in a sea of trivia, is expertly diverted from the real issues at hand: those which invariably, the government wants us to forget.

6. Mainstream media doesn´t ask questions

Image Credit / web.archive.org

Image Credit / web.archive.org

´Check your sources, check your facts´ are golden rules in journalism 101, but you wouldn´t guess that from reading the mainstream press or watching corporate TV channels. At the time of writing, Obama is beating the war drums over Syria. Following accusations by the US and Britain that Assad was responsible for a nerve gas attack on his own civilians last month, most mainstream newspapers- like the afore-mentioned New York Times- have failed to demand evidence or call for restraint on a full-scale attack. But there are several good reasons why journalists should question the official story. Firstly, British right-wing newspaper The Daily Mail actually ran a news piece back in January this year, publishing leaked emails from a British arms company showing the US was planning a false flag chemical attack on Syria´s civilians. They would then blame it on Assad to gain public support for a subsequent full-scale invasion. The article was hastily deleted but a cached version still exists. Other recent evidence lends support to the unthinkable. It has emerged that the chemicals used to make the nerve gas were indeed shipped from Britain, and German intelligence insists Assad was not responsible for the chemical attack. Meanwhile, a hacktivist has come forward with alleged evidence of US intelligence agencies´ involvement in the massacre (download it for yourself here ), with a growing body of evidence suggesting this vile plot was hatched by Western powers. Never overlook the corporate media´s ties to big business and big government before accepting what you are told- because if journalism is dead, you have a right and a duty to ask your own questions.

7. Corporate journalists hate real journalists

Michael Grunwald, senior national correspondent of Time, tweeted that he ´can´t wait to write a defense of the drone that takes out Julian Assange.´ Salon writer David

Image Credit / intellectualrevolution.tv

Image Credit / intellectualrevolution.tv

Sirota rightly points out the irony of this: ´Here we have a reporter expressing excitement at the prospect of the government executing the publisher of information that became the basis for some of the most important journalism in the last decade.´ Sirota goes on to note various examples of what he calls the ´Journalists against Journalism club´, and gives several examples of how The Guardian columnist Glenn Greenwald has been attacked by the corporate press for publishing Snowden´s leaks. The New York Times’ Andrew Ross Sorkin called for Greenwald’s arrest, while NBC’s David Gregory´s declared that Greenwald has ´aided and abetted Snowden´. As for the question of whether journalists can indeed be outspoken, Sirota accurately notes that it all depends on whether their opinions serve or challenge the status quo, and goes on to list the hypocrisy of Greenwald´s critics in depth: ´Grunwald has saber-rattling opinions that proudly support the government’s drone strikes and surveillance. Sorkin’s opinions promote Wall Street’s interests. (The Washington Post´s David) Broder had opinions that supported, among other things, the government’s corporate-serving “free” trade agenda. (The Washington Post´s Bob) Woodward has opinions backing an ever-bigger Pentagon budget that enriches defense contractors. (The Atlantic´s Jeffrey) Goldberg promotes the Military-Industrial Complex’s generally pro-war opinions. (The New York Times´s Thomas) Friedman is all of them combined, promoting both “free” trade and “suck on this” militarism. Because these voices loyally promote the unstated assumptions that serve the power structure and that dominate American politics, all of their particular opinions aren’t even typically portrayed as opinions; they are usually portrayed as noncontroversial objectivity.´

8. Bad news sells, good news is censored, and celebrity gossip trumps important issues

Justin Bieber - Image Credit / Wikimedia

Justin Bieber – Image Credit / Wikimedia

It´s sad but true: bad news really does sell more newspapers. But why? Are we really so pessimistic? Do we relish the suffering of others? Are we secretly glad that something terrible happened to someone else, not us? Reading the corporate press as an alien visiting Earth you might assume so. Generally, news coverage is sensationalist and depressing as hell, with so many pages dedicated to murder, rape and pedophilia and yet none to the billions of good deeds and amazingly inspirational movements taking place every minute of every day all over the planet. But the reasons we consume bad news are perfectly logical. In times of harmony and peace, people simply don´t feel the need to educate themselves as much as they do in times of crises. That´s good news for anyone beginning to despair that humans are apathetic, hateful and dumb, and it could even be argued that this sobering and simple fact is a great incentive for the mass media industry to do something worthwhile. They could start offering the positive and hopeful angle for a change. They could use dark periods of increased public interest to convey a message of peace and justice. They could reflect humanity´s desire for solutions and our urgent concerns for the environment. They could act as the voice of a global population who has had enough of violence and lies to campaign for transparency, equality, freedom, truth, and real democracy. Would that sell newspapers? I think so. They could even hold a few politicians to account on behalf of the people, wouldn´t that be something? But for the foreseeable future, it´s likely the corporate press will just distract our attention with another picture of Rhianna´s butt, another rumor about Justin Bieber´s coke habit, or another article about Kim Kardashian (who is she again?) wearing perspex heels with swollen ankles while pregnant. Who cares about the missing $21 trillion, what was she thinking?

9. Whoever controls language controls the population

Flickr / Jason Ilagan

Flickr / Jason Ilagan

Have you read George Orwell´s classic novel 1984 yet? It´s become a clichéd reference in today´s dystopia, that´s true, but with good reason. There are many- too many- parallels between Orwell´s dark imaginary future and our current reality, but one important part of his vision concerned language. Orwell coined the word ´Newspeak´  to describe a simplistic version of the English language with the aim of limiting free thought on issues that would challenge the status quo (creativity, peace, and individualism for example). The concept of Newspeak includes what Orwell called ´DoubleThink´-  how language is made ambiguous or even inverted to convey the opposite of what is true. In his book, the Ministry of War is known as the Ministry of Love, for example, while the Ministry of Truth deals with propaganda and entertainment. Sound familiar yet? Another book that delves into this topic deeper is Unspeak, a must-read for anyone interested in language and power and specifically how words are distorted for political ends. Terms such as ´peace keeping missiles´, ´extremists´ and ´no-fly zones´, weapons being referred to as ´assets´, or misleading business euphemisms such as ´downsizing´ for redundancy and ´sunset´ for termination- these, and hundreds of other examples, demonstrate how powerful language can be. In a world of growing corporate media monopolization, those who wield this power can manipulate words and therefore public reaction, to encourage compliance, uphold the status quo, or provoke fear.

10. Freedom of the press no longer exists

Flickr / watchingfrogsboil

Flickr / watchingfrogsboil

The only press that is currently free (at least for now) is the independent publication with no corporate advertisers, board of directors, shareholders or CEOs. Details of how the state has redefined journalism are noted here and are mentioned in #7, but the best recent example would be the government´s treatment of The Guardian over its publication of the Snowden leaks. As a side note, it´s possible this paper plays us as well as any other- The Guardian Media Group isn´t small fry, after all. But on the other hand- bearing in mind points 1 to 9- why should we find it hard to believe that after the NSA files were published, editor Alan Rusbridge was told by the powers that be ´you´ve had your fun, now return the files´, that government officials stormed his newsroom and smashed up hard drives, or that Greenwald´s partner David Miranda was detained for 9 hours in a London airport under the Terrorism Act as he delivered documents related to the columnist´s story? Journalism, Alan Rusbridge lamented, ´may be facing a kind of existential threat.´ As CBS Evening News anchor Dan Rather wrote: ‘We have few princes and earls today, but we surely have their modern-day equivalents in the very wealthy who seek to manage the news, make unsavory facts disappear and elect representatives who are in service to their own economic and social agenda… The “free press” is no longer a check on power. It has instead become part of the power apparatus itself.’

Sophie is an award-winning feature writer, investigative journalist, campaigner and author. She is a staff writer for True Activist on issues of peace, justice, society, environment and activism. You can find out more or contact her here.

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43 Responses to "10 Compelling Reasons You Can Never Trust The Mainstream Media"

  1. sirajulislam1  September 11, 2013 at 9:11 am

    This story gives an intelligent perspective on the subject. Sophie McAdam’s arguments are well-supported and logical. It’s insightful story which connects the dots to explain things that aren’t immediately obvious. The information provided in this story help readers better understand the subject. Good journalism takes information that isn’t readily available to the readers, and may be hard to interpret, and makes it quicker and easier to understand. But this story presents the useful information in an interesting way. Last, there are enough links and backgrounds given to explain things. It’s a ‘big picture’ story that looked below the surface. Quality journalism, whether news or opinion is made meaningful by its context, it’s much more than just a list of reliable facts; those facts must complete a mosaic, and when they do, the big picture emerges. Sophie did that. Thanks.

    Reply
    • Sophie  September 12, 2013 at 9:16 am

      Thank you very much Sira, I appreciate your comment very much :)

    • sirajulislam1  September 12, 2013 at 7:09 pm

      You’re welcome, Sophie. I would like to read more of your empirical pieces.

    • Sophie McAdam  September 13, 2013 at 8:38 am

      http://sophielmcadam.wordpress.com

      You can search by keywords or categories for specific issues. You might like the one about last year´s South African mining murder cover-up for starters. You can sign up for an email alert every time I publish something new. Thanks again! :)

  2. Roberto Vicente  September 12, 2013 at 1:50 pm

    Despite the fact that I have no idea what ‘real journalism’ could mean, I believe that everything that has been written above is just as true as there are no bakers baking bread to feed the people, no builders building homes for people to live, no painters struggling to embellish the walls of our living rooms.
    Someone who goes to the bakery believing will take home the bread made with the purest flour, feeds her/himself with daily news believing they were written only to elevate one’s spirit. People living abroad may disregard the little squabbles of the North American media brought by Sophie McAdam.

    Roberto Vicente

    Reply
    • Dale L. Masters  September 23, 2013 at 3:04 am

      Anything the that compromises the integrity of the US press is NOT just “little squabbles” as it affects the freedom of the American people. The press here was established as a government watchdog over what actions the govt was/is taking that might inpinge on freedoms in America. If it happens here, it can spread…

      …or maybe you’re one of those people referred to by the American press as a “member of the elite.”

      All points that were made by this journalist are valid and very important, as any American can tell you.

  3. Jimbarry Gablines  September 13, 2013 at 11:15 am

    we have to give credit to CHE GUEVARA

    Reply
  4. Cindy Bova  September 25, 2013 at 3:44 am

    While the lame street media focus on the obamacare blame game, the monsanto protection act will fly under the radar and screw WE THE PEOPLE! Wake up America, both parties are corrupt and scripted!

    Reply
  5. Paul Kelly  October 7, 2013 at 1:14 pm

    Thanks to you for writing such a clear article of our current mass media situation.
    I believe it will not last. Hopefully within my lifetime we’ll see it crumble from the inside out.
    I for one do not support the mass media, having known logically and intuitively for many years that it’s mostly -as they say in Ireland- a croc of shit.
    Once again, my gratitude for your fine writing. I’ll be reading more of your fine articles…

    Reply
  6. Abolitionist73  November 17, 2013 at 1:22 pm

    The clearest current example of Newspeak is the language relating to abortion. Seriously, next time you see a NARAL or Planned Parenthood or Obama administration rep speaking on abortion, listen *closely.* It’s extremely Orwellian: “Product of conception” “terminate a pregnancy” “contents of the uterus” “just a fetus” “health care” “reproductive rights” … what they are *literally* doing is killing individual human beings in gruesome, often painful ways, for profit. Scientifically, undeniably, a new human individual life beings at conception — that is just plan biological fact; there’s no arguing with that plain science. But the result is: human rights are not for all human beings, they’re for the humans we choose to give them to, for the humans we choose to call “persons.” In other words, via Newspeak, we deny universal human rights in the name of human rights. Prolifers mean “human being” literally; abortion advocates mean “human being” ‘philosophically’ so that not all humans are humans. We’re killing babies — oops, “fetuses” — *and* the English language.

    Honest, informed abortion advocates (a rare breed, mostly academics) admit that the unborn, partially-born and just-born are indeed individual living human beings, but they argue that we have legitimate reasons for killing them (usually, that they are not yet “persons”).

    When Obama gave his “God bless Planned Parenthood” speech, he mentioned cancer 7 times, abortion 0 times. Nevermind PP is the nation’s largest abortion chain. Nevermind that denying an entire class of human beings their legal personhood — their basic human rights — is exactly what American slavery did to blacks and what Nazi’s did to Jews. We do the same *in the name of human rights.* It’s incredible. Orwell was a prophet.

    Reply

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